HOLY COW

By Harvey Woodlawn

 

My parents never did get along too well

and it got worse as time went on;

however,

I do remember very vaguely those early years

when it was not so bad,

it was actually kind of nice;

they would sit at the big wooden dinner table

or in my father’s den

and have long, sprawling talks,

smoke and drink together,

make more children:

friends.

 

And my father was a huge sports fan,

both literally and figuratively,

and whenever one of The Cubs

would hit a home run

he’d scream HOLY COW

right along with Harry Caray

and lift me or my sister or brother way up in the air

over his huge frame and playfully

drop us down to the couch

which seemed like a mile below,

and it was great fun,

and there was some happiness in that house

in those days

 

But those days did not last-

 

he drank more and more,

drugs became everything,

and he’d consume and consume

ESPECIALLY during the ball games;

sometimes hiding every third beer

or so behind his chair

so that when my mother would come in

concerned about how much he’d had

it would look like less-

 

he was a shady motherfucker that way

 

And those ballgames;

those afternoon ballgames

would often interrupt my cartoons:

 

Transformers, He Man, GI Joe-

and that was always disappointing

because I hated sports and I loved those cartoons;

they were all I had to escape

 

Eventually the thing between my mother and my dad

became unbearable

and something broke and he moved out

 

We bid goodbye to him in that cul-de-sac house

on Dwiggins Court

and off he went to live in a trailer park

in Portage

 

eventually he got back on his feet

and we’d start visiting him on weekends,

much to my mother’s disapproval

 

I was 14

and he was still an avid sports fan

but I no longer cared

if the games interrupted my shows-

 

It had become harder and harder for me to

stay interested in cartoons

 

By then,

Prime Time drama

seemed a little more

relatable

Harvey Woodlawn is a prolific zinester whose The Bicycle Tragedy zine can be found at the Grindhouse Cafe and other places around Griffith.
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Author: authorbios

The literary journal dedicated only to author bios.

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